Digital Euphoria: The Rise of ASMR

Back to Article
Back to Article

Digital Euphoria: The Rise of ASMR

Genesis Sandoval, Editor

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






An autonomous sensory meridian response sounds like an overly complicated concept, but it is actually an increasingly common YouTube trend. Autonomous sensory meridian response, or ASMR, is an experience described as a tingling sensation that one receives from satisfying sounds, visuals, etc. This YouTube trend brings up thousands of videos with up to millions of views of people simply trying to invoke this tingling sensation in viewers.

From the sounds of whispering, to even someone chewing with their mouth open, people find their ASMR “triggers” from almost anything. Some of the top triggers seen on YouTube are whispering, soap cutting, personal attention, rain sounds, satisfying art, and cooking. But whatever someone’s niche is, there is probably an ASMR video for that.

A student who asked to be anonymous watches ASMR often, and it helps her in her daily life. “It kind of started with like, the slime videos,” she explains. ASMR saw a rise in popularity from slime videos, another popular YouTube trend. Thousands of people make videos of them making slime and playing with it, which essentially started the ambush of “satisfying videos” and ASMR. “ASMR sort of has this weird reputation, but it’s not just girls whispering into microphones. Plenty of people, including me, use it for things like trying to go to sleep, and it works!” the anonymous student says.

But ASMR isn’t always seen as so helpful. As the previous student mentioned, ASMR does have a weird reputation. The trend is perceived as often more sexual than not, but it is quite the opposite. ASMR can be intimate for some, but many have argued there is a little-to-no link between ASMR and sexual pleasure. Some also criticize the types of videos ASMR creates. There are many videos of someone chewing loudly, which is often seen as gross, or just someone playing with slime for millions of viewers, which is criticized for the lack of talent required.

Sophomore Nicholas Jones is one who doesn’t understand why ASMR is popular in the first place. “Why are these videos getting millions upon millions of views? I get how things are ‘satisfying’ but it feels like there’s no need for ASMR to be everywhere,” Jones says. “It just seems repetitive and boring to keep pulling out ASMR video ideas out of nowhere,” he adds.

No matter your opinion of ASMR, the phenomenon is undeniably interesting. And if you have any interest in trying to find that tingling sensation, there is probably a video for you.